• Wilson Reading Program-Step 1 Overview

    In Wilson Step 1, students learn to identify closed syllables.  These syllables have short vowel sounds and are characterized by a consonant (or digraph)-vowel-consonant (or digraph)pattern, such as wish, chop and cap. Students learned that some closed syllables have a “bonus letter” which is doubled at the end (call, huff, hiss).

    Students have learned keywords to help them remember the short vowel sounds.  These keywords are apple, Ed, itch, octopus, and up.  They have also learned to decode words with the suffix -s ending (dogs, chills, bugs), even though the suffix -s sometimes sounds like a z.

    To be ready to move to Step 2, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy, and 15 nonsense words (bap, shig, mots) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 1 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    a                                                                                                    the

    to                                                                                                  what                “What hat should I wear?”                   

    has                                                                                                is          
    of                                                                                                  both
    push “Don’t you push!”                                                            was

    put

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 2 Overview

    In Wilson Step 2, students learn to read words with welded sounds, or word “chunks”.  Some welded sounds we have learned are –ang,-ing, -onk, -unk.  Students learn to quickly recognize and read these sounds in words such as in hang, sing, honk,or junk. 

    Students practice quickly identifying two- and three- letter blends in words to sound words out more fluently.  Examples of these are in words like bled, past and scrap. Practice also includes reading and spelling these words with the suffix–s at the end.

    To be ready to move to Step 3, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (sniff, strong, twists), and 15 nonsense words (shomp, brench, trasp) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 2   Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    from                                                                                                                           month mon…….th

    want        “I do not want an ant in my pants!”    

    friend           Fridayis the end of the week and I get to see my friend.”
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 3 Overview

    In Wilson Step 3, students learn to decode multi-syllable, short vowel sound words.  Children must know the rules for dividing syllables, and be able to use them to help them read larger words such as catnip, wagon, disrupt, and fragment. Students also become familiar with words that end in –ct such as district and contract.   

    Students practice dividing syllables in these larger words to sound words out more fluently.  Examples of these are in words like Wisconsin, Atlantic, and establish. Practice also includes reading and spelling words with the suffixes –s,-ed, and -ing at the end.

    To be ready to move to Step 4, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (misconduct, disconnected, punishing), and 15 nonsense words (casbit, enflonting, admested) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 3 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    they             “There is no A in they!”

    often            think…  “of  ten”

    almost          (remember only one L)
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 4 Overview

    In Wilson Step 4, students learn to decode words with a vowel-consonant-e pattern.  In these words, the vowel uses it’s long sound while the final –e remains silent. This pattern is found in words like hope, cave, and tape. 

    Once the student is fluent in discerning the differences between closed syllable andvowel-consonant-e syllable words (cap/cape, not/note, pet/Pete), the next step is reading and spelling combinations of these syllables.  Examples of these combinations would be found in words like reptile, combine, compensate, and illustrate.  In addition, students must be able to decode these words with the suffix endings previously learned  (-s, -ed, -ing).    Students also learn to identify the exception to the vowel-consonant-e rule, which are words that end in –ive such as olive or expensive.

    To be ready to move to Step 5, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (valentines, dictated, postpone), and 15 nonsense words (glire,sheves, immone) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 4 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    are                                                                                                           were

    come “Mom wants us to come home.”     

    done              “If you eat one you will be done.”

    gone              “If you eat one they will be gone.”

    none              “If you eat one there will be none left.”

    one                                                                                                some

    sure

    there             “Don’t put thathere, put that there"

    where           “Should I put this here or where?”
     
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 5 Overview

    In Wilson Step 5, students learn a new syllable type: the Open Syllable.  These syllables end in a vowel that uses the long sound (as in hi or me).  They also learn to decode two vowel sounds for the letter y (long i sound in one syllable words, as in cry; or long e sound in multisyllabic words as in baby.)

    Once the student is fluent in decoding open syllable words, they are combined with vowel-consonant-e and closed syllables to create multisyllabic words such as protect, decline, instrument, and indicate. In addition, students must be able to decode these words with the suffix endings previously learned  (-s,-ed,  -ing).   

    To be ready  to move to Step 6, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percentaccuracy (continent, umbrella, galaxy), and 15 nonsense words (prespere,triden, stomest) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 5 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    do                                                                                        two                 W

    who                                                                                     also

    into                                                                                     become

    nothing                 No    thing

    any

    many             “If you can spellany, you can spell many.”

    only

    busy               “A bus is always busy!”   

    above
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 6 Overview

    In Wilson Step 6, students practice decoding the three syllable types in combination, with new suffix endings, (-er, -est, -en, -es, -able, -ish, -y, -ive, -ly, -ty,-less, -ness, -ment, -ful) added to unchanging basewords such as in thankful and classy.  Students also work with the –ed ending with unchanging basewords, and learned that it has different sounds:/d/, /ed/, /t/.  Examples are thrilled, disrupted,and punished.

    Once the student is fluent in decoding these words, they begin reading words with two suffixes to an unchanging baseword, such as in constructively and helpfulness.

    A final skill learned in Step 6 is a new syllable type; the final syllable consonant-le, and the –stle exception. Words with these endings are dribble and whistle.

    To be ready to move to Step 7, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (helpfully, puzzle, amazement), and 15 nonsense words (plonker,closhed, and retrenchful) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 6 Sight Word to practice reading and spelling:

    people        Purple elephants oftenpush little elephants.”   
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 7 Overview

    In Wilson Step 7, students learn sound options for the letters c and g.  The sound of these letters changes when they are followed by an e, i, or y.  Examples are concentrate, concede, gentle, and pungent. Students also work with the –ge,-ce, -dge endings in words like lunge, indulgence, and fudge.

    Once the student is fluent in decoding these words, they begin reading words with a new trigraph pattern (-tch) and a new digraph pattern (ph).  Trigraphs and digraphs are patterns of letters that make one sound.  Students also work with the endings –sion and –tion as in subtraction and expansion.

    A final skill learned in Step 7 is a review of contractions and two words that they stand for.

    To be ready to move to Step 8, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (photograph, silence, who’s), and 15 nonsense words (phosphile, ronvince, comlige) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 7 Sight Word to practice reading and spelling:
    above
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 9 Overview

    In Wilson Step 9, students learn to read words with Vowel Teams.  These are “double vowels” that often make one sound.  You will find vowel diagraphsthat make the long a sound (plain, display), long e sound (tweezer, valley), long o sound (croak, toe), and long u sound (revenue). There are also teams that make a new sound (oi, oy, au, aw, ou, ow, oo, ea, eu, ew, and ui).  Examples of these words are thyroid, employ, saucer, squawk, trousers, drowsy, sloop, eat, bread, steak, Europe, few and suit.

    To be ready to move to Step 9, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (awkward, shampoo, charcoal), and 15 nonsense words (doice, bleaster, prewst) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    Step 9 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    color                                 answer                             mother

    every                                  father                               other

    very                                  again                                against

    always                              said                                         says

    today                                been                                 they

    does                                 goes                                laugh

    could                                should                              would

    your                                  hour                                  though

    through                            already

    because   big elephants canalways use small elephants.”
     
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 10 Overview

    In Wilson Step 10, students learn add suffixes to basewords that change.  They learn the rules for vowel-consonant-e exceptions (the vowel does not say it’s long sound) in words like scrimmage, justice, or cottage.   Students learn todrop the final e from a baseword to add a suffix such as in taping or struggling.  They also learn how to add a suffix to a one-syllable baseword such as starred, flabby or regretting.  Finally, they learn additional suffixes like  –ic, -ible, and -ous. 

    To be ready to move to Step 11, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (likable, notice, convinced), and 15 nonsense words (deproving, blacy, glabbage) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    There are no Step 10 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling.  Students may benefit from practicing previous lists.
     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 11 Overview

    In Wilson Step 11, students learn how to use y as a vowel in open, closed andv owel-consonant-e syllables (reply, gym, type). They also learn the Y spelling rule for adding suffixes to words ending in y—that is, if the word ends in a double vowel (ey, ay, oy), then the suffix can be added to word (boys, boyish).  But if the words end in a y that is an open syllable (long vowel sound), the y mustc hange to an i before adding the ending. For instance, baby-babied, or baby-babies.  If the suffix begins with i, then leave the y and and the ending (babyish).  Studentswill also learn the vowel teams of ie and ei (piece/ceiling= “i before e except after c”).  Ei  sometimes says the long a sound (vein).  Other variations are –igh (light) and     –eigh (eight). 

    To be ready to move to Step 12, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (pennies, moonlight, symptom), and 15 nonsense words (semidrome, prystal, murvoyed) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

     

    Step 11 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling:

    their

    height

     

    Wilson Reading Program-Step 12 Overview

    In Wilson Step 12, students learn about silent letter combinations.  Some examples are the rh in rhythm, gh in ghost, mb in lamb, mn in column, kn in knife, gn in gnat, and wr in wrist.  Students learn that w can effect vowel sounds like in water and worship.  Another sound for /k/ is ch as in chorus, and que as in clique.  Students also learn and practice sounds of ti in patient, ci in official, tu in actual, and ture in torture.  Finally, students practice using “chameleon” prefixes that end like the beginning of the baseword and so double the consonant, like unnecessary, misspell or disservice.

    To be ready to move out of Step 12, students must be able to read 15 real words with 100 percent accuracy (adventure, knit, thumb), and 15 nonsense words (blisten,worf, stumb) with 87 percent accuracy (13 out of 15 words).

    There are no Step 12 Sight Words to practice reading and spelling.  Students may benefit from practicing previous lists.